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GPS Jamming in the Mediterranean Sea

For best experience, please view on a desktop computer.

This data repository accompanies Space Threat Assessment 2020, a featured report from the CSIS Aerospace Security Project. 

Both military and civilian entities make regular use of satellite-enabled Global Positioning System (GPS) and communication technology via signals transmitted over various radio frequencies. However, reliable transmission of this information can be disrupted through electronic counterspace attacks, including jamming and spoofing.

From March to December 2019, civil naval GPS users in the Mediterannean Sea experienced unknown signal disruptions in different port cities. The interactive map above highlights these instances, all of which were self reported by the GPS users themselves. Without GPS, ship captains can lose the ability to verify their precise position.

Electronic attacks are not always precise, therefore discrete points presented on the maps do not necessarily represent the full scope signal loss of jamming-affected areas. 

Methodology

In this database, “signal loss” is defined as instances in which users were reported loss of access to normally-available satellite-enabled data, which can include GPS and communication services.

This database was constructed using the GPS Problem Reports Status, a list of submitted reports of GPS problems to the Navigation Center of Excellence, supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the United States Coast Guard. All cases used were determined by the Navigation Center to be “Unknown Interference,” and all had a singular date of disruption listed. 

This interactive data repository is a product of the Andreas C. Dracopoulos iDeas Lab, the in-house digital, multimedia, and design agency at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Special thanks to Lindsay Urchyk for her work developing this tool.